Paul Stanley on reluctance to write new KISS music: “It’s setting myself up for disappointment”

The frontman says any new music the band makes will “never compete with the past".

Paul Stanley has spoken out about his lack of interest in writing new music with KISS, stating that any new releases are destined to fail when held in comparison to the band’s earlier discography.

During an interview on the Howie Mandel Does Stuff podcast yesterday (August 24), Paul Stanely shared his reluctant attitude towards writing new music with KISS – confessing that the thought of going back to the studio to make a new album is something he considers to be ‘setting himself up for disappointment’.

The topic arose when the frontman was asked by the two hosts, Howie Mandel and Jackelyn Shultz, if he was currently working on any upcoming releases with the glam band, to which he responded:

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“No. Because at this point, I came to the conclusion that it can never compete with the past… not because it’s not as good, but it hasn’t the connection to important times in your life.”

He continues, explaining that while he believes that the band’s most recent releases showcase the members’ best work, the sheer status of their earlier hits means any new tracks are destined to fail in comparison.

“We did two albums in the last, I think probably 10 years, and there are songs on those that are every bit as good as anything I’ve ever written, but they’re new,” he explains. “It doesn’t have that patina to it [… for example, we made] Modern Day Delilah, which is as good as Love Gun or any of these songs, but it hasn’t aged; it’s not like wine that has a chance to have grown in importance. Not because of what it is, but because of what it’s surrounded by.”

Later on in the interview, Stanley opened up about the sense of disappointment he often has when releasing new music. Explaining how he feels disheartened to see his new songs not receive the same reception as their 1970s hits, “The Starchild” says he would rather turn his efforts elsewhere.

“I think it’s setting myself up for disappointment,” he admits. “Not crushing disappointment, but when you put your heart and soul into doing something and it kind of gets a polite nod, there’s other things I’d rather do.”

Find the full interview with Paul Stanley below.

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