source audio true spring reverb

Source Audio has released the True Spring Reverb—a pedal that replicates the vintage nuances of spring reverb, with the added option of dialing in classic tremolo.

The stompbox’s take on spring reverb builds on a mechanical design by the Hammond Organ Company from the late 1930s, while its tremolo functions are extracted from Source Audio’s popular Vertigo Tremolo circuit.

When switched on, the pedal is in reverb mode, but you can dial in tremolo options by holding down the “Control Input” button. Alternatively, you can use an external footswitch.

A three-way switch toggles between the three specific reverb modes—or tremolo presets, with “Control Input” depressed. Here’s a quick look at the settings:

Short

  • Reverb: Short spring reverb, offers a taut reverb with quick decay and smooth trails.
  • Tremolo: Opto Tremolo, characterized by a distinct choppy signal.

Long

  • Reverb: Long spring reverb, produces deep reverb decays with a distinct ‘drip’ trail.
  • Tremolo: Harmonic Tremolo, has modulating qualities similar to that of a phaser.

Tank

  • Reverb: Tank spring reverb, produces a reverb that has a ‘drippy’ attack and animated trails.
  • Tremolo: Bias Tremolo, blends smooth amplitude modulation with a mild overdrive created by tube saturation.

The True Spring Reverb has four knobs which sculpt its reverb and tremolo density: “Level,” “Mix,” “Dwell” and “Tone.” The first two need little explanation. “Dwell,” on the other hand, shapes reverb thickness or tremolo depth, and “Tone” contributes to the shade of reverb or tremolo rate.

Additionally, the pedal has a MIDI function that is linked to Source Audio’s Neuro Editing Systems—a powerful app-based editing tool housing an advanced collection of deep editing parameters.

Hear the True Spring Reverb in action here:

Retails at $229. For more info, check out sourceaudio.net.